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Customer list of illegal Sky IPTV users seized after two arrested in raids

Customer list of illegal Sky IPTV users seized after two arrested in raids

After a police raid in the UK, officers have confiscated a customer list which shows who's illegally streaming Sky IPTV.

With Netflix upping their subscription rates and other streaming platforms hiking prices, many people have turned to the 'dodgy box' to access channels.

Though as tempting as it may be, it's illegal and law enforcement is cracking down on it.

After the police raided a home in the UK, they arrested two men - aged 33 and 35 - on suspicion of fraud, money laundering and intellectual property offences.

The officers also seized a list of customers that use or have registered for illegally streaming Sky IPTV.

According to the police, the criminals made a profit of £800k / Stefano Madrigali / RFStock / Getty
According to the police, the criminals made a profit of £800k / Stefano Madrigali / RFStock / Getty

The raid was part of an ongoing probe from the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit (ERSOU), whereby officers have executed warrants in Harlow and Chigwell in Essex, Waltham Cross in Hertfordshire, and Lanarkshire in Scotland.

Detective Inspector Steve Payne, from ERSOU's Regional Organised Crime Unit, said: 'We have also gained access to the details of those purchasing the streams, and I would remind anyone doing so that they will be breaking the law and could ultimately be subject to criminal proceedings.'

The packages provided unauthorised access to Sky TV and are presumed to have been re-sold to thousands of customers, generating a profit of £800,000.

Specialist financial investigators also seized £17,000 in cash, fire sticks, phones, laptops, and two shotguns.

Both males were released on bail after questioning.

Besides the illegality of streaming the channels, Cybercrime expert Dr John Dempsey from the University of Central Lancashire reveals that the 'dodgy stick' could live up to its name even more - unbeknownst to the user.

The 'dodgy stick' may collect network data from your home internet / Stefano Madrigali / RFStock / Getty
The 'dodgy stick' may collect network data from your home internet / Stefano Madrigali / RFStock / Getty

Dempsey stated: 'A firestick contains an 'operating system' which can be infected by malicious software, which could then infect any device it is connected to - this may give a criminal access to other devices that are connected to your home network.'

Criminal hosts could be selling users' personal data and financial information.

He continued: 'The person selling the firestick may even have included vulnerabilities or backdoors that allow them to access your network and collect network data.'

Detective Sergeant John Tuer, who formerly worked for Greater Manchester Police, shed light on how police forces investigate the gangs behind these illegal streaming services.

'Intelligence sources might come from individual people, seized devices which contain IP addresses of the illegal streaming services or internet service providers themselves,' he said.

The Director of Anti-Piracy, UK and ROI, at Sky emphasised that if anyone is concerned with the risks can visit BeStreamWise.com for more information.

Featured Image Credit: Stefano Madrigali / RFStock / Getty